Return Policy

The Crux return policy has been updated. Here it is for your easy reference:

  • 10 days with receipt, in original condition with refund based on original method of payment EXCEPT
  • NO RETURNS on sale/clearance/marked down items, spacial orders, sealed items, and used books;
  • TEXTBOOK RETURNS — 10 days with receipt, in original condition for store credit only, with no returns after September 30, 2013.

Please note: a 10% restocking fee may apply on certain returns.

Myths about Books and Reading

In a recent blog post, Robert Bruce exploded five myths about reading. Bruce proposed that we can learn from fiction, we all have time for reading, reading is an important activity, our opinions about books we read matter, and real reading doesn’t depend upon genre.

The myths about reading reminded me of some myths about books and buying them that we hear in the bookshop regularly. Here are some common book-buying myths:

  1. Buying books is a temptation one should always resist. Most staff at Crux can sympathize with the idea that buying books is a temptation. Books, however, are not inherently bad for you, like junk food. Reading books has been known to feed your soul. Feeding your soul is a good thing, not something to resist. Buying books is, therefore, sometimes a soul-feeding activity that should be embraced.
  2. Books are too expensive. What are you comparing the price of a book to? At an hourly rate, books are excellent entertainment value. Further, books can be invaluable companions over a long period of time. They are soul food (see above). It is true that some books are expensive. Many are worth the price. Reviews and personal recommendations can help you choose which are worth adding to your library.
  3. I don’t have time for reading. What is important? If you think that reading is important, you can make time for it. One regular Crux patron, a busy priest in an urban parish, reads many books by setting aside time at the end of the day. Books refresh and restore her for the next day in ministry.

What prevents you from buying and reading books?

Bookmarks from Bookshops

When sorting the used books that come into Crux, I often find bookmarks advertising bookshops — most of these bookshops are now closed sadly. I want to visit them, but cannot. Here are two I’d like to see.

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James Thin of Edinburgh specialized in religion and theology and claimed one of the largest stocks of books in Britain. Oh to be able to browse in this shop! A little digging produces the fact that the flagship bookshop is now Blackwell’s, Edinburgh. Apparently Muriel Sparks wrote her novels on notebooks from Thin’s. Who knew that a bookmark would have so much interesting history behind it?

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I can’t find as much information about Diversity Antiques and Collectibles, Inc. of Halifax, N.S., though it appears that Mr. McGee is no longer in business. I’ve never been to Halifax, but I’d like to go — there seem to be a lot of interesting second-hand bookshops in the area. Why else would you want to go to Halifax?